August 2014

 

  From the Dragons’ Den

 

At a recent primary school Assembly the story under consideration was that of the Good Samaritan. A modern-day idea of this story was provided for the children with anecdotes about my own recent accident, following which I spent time in a wheel chair. During that period trips to town or to the supermarket became especially interesting in that one was constantly amazed at the differences in behaviour displayed by the general public.  On being faced with the prospect of entering a shop, one experienced various attitudes; one where someone would pause, smile, hold the door open and assist wheelchair-passenger, wheelchair-pusher, bags and baggage through with a smile and a good wish; or one where a quick glance invigorated the ‘glancer’ to leap ahead, open the door, dash through before letting the said door close in the face of the struggling caravan. Likewise, in the supermarket one could begin to imagine that some shoppers had made it their daily obligation to block all aisles and shelves in order to continue their avid, and obviously crucial, conversations; whereas other shoppers did all they could to assist the struggling shopper to obtain the necessary items which always seemed to be on the top shelf.

 

So, where do these habits of helping, or not helping, come from.  We all live in an increasingly busy and hectic world, yet there are those who will find time to assist and support and those who cannot.

 

Interestingly at Little Dragons one can see the habits developing.  Initially, our little people, take what they want – find it difficult to share – think solely of their own desires.  However, as time elapses, usually somewhere around the age of three years, there is a sudden interest by some in ‘helping’ – to set out the cushions ready for Storytime, to call out ‘Storytime’ around the various parts of the building, to give out the bowls ready for fruit and – a firm favourite – helping to clear the equipment at the end of the morning.  This last sometimes making much extra work for the Senior Dragons but none-the-less is well received.

 

At some point in our lives it seems that we develop the capacity to see or not see when help is needed, to do or not do when people need our input. So, I wonder, has the Good Samaritan in us been there since our young days and nurtured, or otherwise, by those around us through the example they may have given.  Perhaps that little voice within that we sometimes hear – and sometimes choose to ignore, is that same Good Samaritan struggling to get out!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Val Butterworth